GWT,  Video Gaming

Remembering Excitebike for NES wed-NES-day

The Nintendo Entertainment System was my first home video game console. I have, in the past, recalled my first adventures with this magical console. So, the retro gaming community on social media likes to take Wednesdays to honor this great console. After all, it is wed-NES-day.

So, the first game on this series of blogs I will recall is a game I first played at my cousin’s. I was on summer vacation and my Uncle was babysitting me. I was approximately 9 years old. In reality, my cousin’s NES was doing more of the heavy lifting. After all, he had almost a different line up of games than I did. One game that made an impression on me was Excitebike.

So join in the discussion of ExciteBike either here in the comments or on social media. Be on the lookout for future #wedNESday posts to get in on the discussion.

About ExciteBike

Excitebike was released on the NES in 1984 and was based on the Arcade version. It was a close to perfect port as well, and even included a new design mode on top of all of that.

The object of the game was that you had to race other bikes while also avoiding traps, making sick jumps, trying not to wipe out, and making sure not to overheat your bike. It was very simple to pick up, challenging to master all of those mechanics at once.

The track editor was probably the best part of the game. It was one of the first video game releases to have such a mode and added almost infinite replay value. The only drawback was though the game did not save your tracks so you would have to create a new track each time you powered up the Nintendo Entertainment System. Having said that, it was still an amazing feature.

Your Memories

So, how did you, the community, recall this game?

Not only that, but I proposed a way to bring this game back and modernize it a bit by adding Community Shared tracks.

See, I love memories like this.

The lack of 2 player is, indeed, a fair criticism. Thankfully, it was rectified in the sequels but I would like to see it added on to the original.

It would just be nice to save tracks in general as the NES version just didn’t allow for that. If only I could track down an affordable and fully functional Famicom Disk System from somewhere.

This one is from Instagram. You can follow GeekWithThat on Instagram too!

As you can see, classic video games such as ExciteBike hold personal cherished memories for everyone. That is why I love discussing what they mean to people. Thank you Kalaab.

ExciteBike’s Legacy

This game has went on to spawn 4 more games in the series.

ExciteBike 64 (Nintendo 64) – This was released towards the end of the lifespan of the Nintendo 64 in which it already had very crowded racing game library. It did also have a track editor.

ExciteTruck (Nintendo Wii) – ExciteTruck was a launch title for the Nintendo Wii using the Motion controls. It retained such classic features such as managing overheating.

ExciteBots (Nintendo Wii) -This received a limited release in North America towards the end of the Nintendo Wii’s run. It was a quirky take on the classic Excite series with racing and other mini games.

I have not played any of these previous three titles personally, but their MetaCritic scores and overall reception for the games are very positive.

ExciteBike: World Rally (WiiWare) – This game did have a track editor and you were able to share the tracks with friends. Having said that, the online service for Nintendo Wii was not optimal and very confusing. To me, it was confusing on how to even add someone as a friend in general on the system, but you had to add someone as a friend in each game via a Friend Code. The game itself was decent though.

Again, I feel an online version of the NES/Arcade version of ExciteBike with a community tracks sharing feature would do very well as we live in a nostalgia heavy era and on how much more simplified the online system is for the Switch.

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